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Émigré Cultures in Design and Architecture

Émigré Cultures in Design and Architecture

by Alison J. Clarke

Alison Clarke is professor of design history and director of the Papanek Foundation, University of Applied Arts Vienna, Austria. She is the editor of Design Anthropology: Object Culture in the 21st Century (2010) and the author of Tupperware: The Promise of Plastic in 1950s America (2014), and of the forthcoming Designer for the Real World: Victor Papanek and 1970s Design Activism. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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and Elana Shapira

Elana Shapira is a lecturer of design history and theory, and a senior researcher in the Émigré Cultural Networks project at the University of Applied Arts Vienna, Austria. She is the author of the forthcoming title Style and Seduction: Jewish Patrons and Modern Architecture and Design in Fin de Siècle Vienna. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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(eds)
Bloomsbury Academic, 2017
  • DOI:
    10.5040/9781474275637
  • ISBN:
    978-1-4742-7560-6 (hardback)

    978-1-4742-7561-3 (epdf)

    978-1-4742-7562-0 (epub)

    978-1-4742-7563-7 (online)
  • Edition:
    First edition
  • Place of Publication:
    London
  • Published Online:
    2018
Émigré Cultures in Design and Architecture
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Émigré Cultures in Design and Architecture considers the lasting contribution made by Central European designers and architects to twentieth-century architecture.

Featuring original writing from leading academics in the field, this edited collection examines how oppositional stances in debates concerning consumption and modernism’s social agendas in Europe prefigured the adoption or rejection of émigrés such as Joseph Binder, Josef Frank and Felix Augenfeld by American culture. The contributors to this cutting-edge volume argue that émigrés and refugees from fascist Europe drew on the particular experiences of their home countries, and networks of émigré and exiled designers in the United States, developing a humanist, progressive and socially inclusive design culture which continues to influence design practice today.