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eBooks

11 eBooks

      A century after the Bauhaus's founding in 1919, this book reassesses it as more than a highly influential art, architecture, and design school. In myriad ways, emerging ideas about the body in relation to health, movement, gender, and sexuality were at the heart of art and life at the school. Bauhaus Bodies reassesses the work of both well-known Bauhaus members and those who have unjustifiably escaped scholarly scrutiny, its women in particular.

      In fourteen original, cutting-edge essays by established experts and emerging scholars, this book reveals how Bauhaus artists challenged traditional ideas about bodies and gender. Written to appeal to students, scholars, and the broad public, Bauhaus Bodies will be essential reading for anyone interested in modern art, architecture, design history, and gender studies; it will define conversations and debates during the 2019 centenary of the Bauhaus's founding and beyond.

      Changing Things

      The Future of Objects in a Digital World

      Author(s):

      Johan Redström and Heather Wiltse

      Many of the things we now live with do not take a purely physical form. Objects such as smart phones, laptops and wearable fitness trackers are different from our things of the past. These new digital forms are networked, dynamic and contextually configured. They can be changeable and unpredictable, even inscrutable when it comes to understanding what they actually do and whom they really serve.

      In this compelling new volume, Johan Redström and Heather Wiltse address critical questions that have assumed a fresh urgency in the context of these rapidly-developing forms. Drawing on critical traditions from a range of disciplines that have been used to understand the nature of things, they develop a new vocabulary and a theoretical approach that allows us to account for and address the multi-faceted, dynamic, constantly evolving forms and functions of contemporary things. In doing so, the book prototypes a new design discourse around everyday things, and describes them as fluid assemblages.

      Redström and Wiltse explore how a new theoretical framework could enable a richer understanding of things as fluid and networked, with a case study of the evolution of music players culminating in an in-depth discussion of Spotify. Other contemporary ‘things’ touched on in their analysis include smart phones and watches, as well as digital platforms and applications such as Google, Facebook and Twitter.

      Design Anthropology brings together leading international design theorists, consultants and anthropologists to explore the changing object culture of the 21st century.

      Decades ago, product designers used basic market research to fine-tune their designs for consumer success. Today the design process has been radically transformed, with the user center-stage in the design process. From design ethnography to culture probing, innovative designers are employing anthropological methods to elicit the meanings rather than the mere form and function of objects. This important volume provides a fascinating exploration of the issues facing the shapers of our increasingly complex material world.

      The text features case studies and investigations covering a diverse range of academic disciplines. From IKEA and anti-design to erotic twenty-first-century needlework and online interior decoration, the book positions itself at the intersections of design, anthropology, material culture, architecture, and sociology.

      Designers, Users and Justice

      Author(s):

      Turkka Keinonen

      How do we design for users? How might users best participate in the design process? How can we evaluate the user’s experience of designed products and services? These fundamental questions are addressed in Designers, Users, and Justice, through a series of dialogues between a design scholar and a designer. In a series of conversations, the scholar and the designer address the concepts and practice of user centred design, examining whether a 'just method' necessarily leads to a just design, consider different models for understanding user experience and socially productive design, including the capability approach and utilitarianism, and ponder how an ethical framework for evaluating design might be developed.

      Throughout, the scholar and the designer draw on their particular experiences in design practice and design education, and propose alternative conceptualisations of the key ideas of user centred design, highlighting and seeking to address the ethical shortcomings of mainstream user centred design practice.

      Design Roots

      Culturally Significant Designs, Products, and Practices

      Editor(s):

      Stuart Walker, Martyn Evans, Tom Cassidy, Jeyon Jung and Amy Twigger Holroyd

      Design Roots provides a comprehensive review of culturally significant designs, products and practices which are rooted to particular communities through making tradition and a sense of place. Many rich traditional practices associated with community, tacit knowledge and culture are being rapidly lost due to globalisation and urbanisation. Yet they have much to offer for the future in terms of sustainability, identity, wellbeing and new opportunities in design.

      This book considers the creative roots, the place-based ecologies, and deep understandings of cultural significance, not only in terms of history and tradition but also in terms of locale, social interactions, innovation, and change for the sustainment of culturally significant material productions. Importantly, these are not locked in time by sentimentality and nostalgia but are evolving, innovative, and adaptive to new technologies and changing circumstances.

      Contributing authors explore the historical roots of culturally significant designs, products and practices, emerging directions, amateur endeavours, enterprise models, business opportunities and the changing role and contribution of design in the creation of material cultures of significance, meaning and value.

      An international perspective is provided through case studies and research from North and South America, Africa, Europe, Asia and Australasia, with examples including Aran jumper production in Northern Ireland, weaving in Thailand, Iranian housing design, Brazilian street design and digital crafting in the United Kingdom.

      Flow

      Interior, landscape and architecture in the era of liquid modernity

      Editor(s):

      Penny Sparke, Pat Brown, Patricia Lara-Betancourt, Gini Lee and Mark Taylor

      Flow combines cutting-edge scholarship with practitioner perspectives to address the concept of ‘flow’ and how it connects interiors, landscapes and buildings, expanding on traditional notions of architectural prominence. Contributors explore the transitional and intermediary relationships between inside/outside. Through a range of case studies, authors extend the notion of flow beyond the western industrialised world and embrace a wider geography while engaging with the specificity of climate and place. Accompanied by stunning colour illustration and photography, Flow brings together historical, theoretical and practice-based approaches to consider themes of nature, mobility, continuity and frames.

      Modern Asian Design

      Author(s):

      D. J. Huppatz

      Modern Asian Design provides a comprehensive introduction to the development of Asian design in the modern period, both tracing historical threads and offering a theoretical framework within which to chart the history of design in Asia.

      Rather than a singular “Asian history”, this book presents a series of studies centred on trade routes, colonial relationships, regional networks and cross-cultural exchanges. Modern Asian Design builds on existing resources beyond design history in an effort to map the field, focusing particularly on relations between Asia and the West and also across Asian design cultures.

      Opening with a brief overview of trade and exchange networks in the 17th and 18th centuries, the bulk of this study comprises analysis of the development of modern design in Asia during the later 19th and early 20th centuries, a period of rapid modernisation. The book’s final two chapters bring these central ideas into a contemporary and highly relevant context.

      Norman Bel Geddes

      American Design Visionary

      Author(s):

      Nicolas P. Maffei

      Norman Bel Geddes has long been considered the ‘founder’ of American industrial design. During his long career he worked on everything from theatre design, world fairs and cars to houses and product and packaging design.

      Nicolas P. Maffei’s magisterial biography draws on original material from the archive at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin, and places Bel Geddes’ work within the fast-changing cultural and intellectual contexts of his time. Maffei shows how Bel Geddes’ futuristic but pragmatic style – his notion of ‘practical vision’ – was central to his work, and highly influential on the professional practice of American industrial design in general.

      Suffrage and the Arts

      Visual Culture, Politics and Enterprise

      Editor(s):

      Miranda Garrett and Zoë Thomas

      Suffrage and the Arts re-establishes the central role that artistic women and men—from jewellers, portrait painters, embroiderers, through to retailers of ‘artistic’ products—played in the suffrage campaign in Britain. As political individuals, they were foot soldiers who helped sustain the momentum of the movement and as designers, makers and sellers they spread the message of the campaign to new local, national and international audiences, mediating how suffrage activism was understood by society at large. Published to coincide with the centenary of the 1918 Representation of the People Act, which granted the vote to women over the age of thirty meeting a property qualification, this edited collection offers a range of new perspectives and readings of the outpouring of creative responses to the campaign.

      Contributors, who include historians, art historians, curators, museum professionals and suffrage experts, call upon the historiographical developments of the last thirty years, alongside new archival discoveries, to showcase the vibrancy of ongoing research in this area. Throughout, chapters investigate the wider socio-cultural backdrop to suffrage and the women’s movement, the difficult choices that were made between professional, artistic aspirations and political commitment, and how institutional and informal networks influenced creative expression and participation in feminist politics. From shining light on the use of portraiture to bolster the cultural cachet of the militant Women’s Social and Political Union, uncovering the links between Victorian interior design, enterprise and suffrage, through to questioning the supposed conservativism of women’s art institutions during the campaign and in the inter-war era, Suffrage and the Arts is a timely and important collection which will contribute to a number of scholarly fields.

      The Design Politics of the Passport presents an innovative study of the passport and its associated social, political and material practices as a means of uncovering the workings of ‘design politics’. It traces the histories, technologies, power relations and contestations around this small but powerful artefact to establish a framework for understanding how design is always enmeshed in the political, and how politics can be understood in terms of material objects.

      Combining design studies with critical border studies, alongside ethnographic work among undocumented migrants, border transgressors and passport forgers, this book shows how a world made and designed as open and hospitable to some is strictly enclosed, confined and demarcated for many others - and how those affected by such injustices dissent from the immobilities imposed on them through the same capacity of design and artifice.

      Tricky Design

      The Ethics of Things

      Editor(s):

      Tom Fisher and Lorraine Gamman

      Tricky Things responds to the burgeoning of scholarly interest in the cultural meanings of objects, by addressing the moral complexity of certain designed objects and systems.

      The volume brings together leading international designers, scholars and critics to explore some of the ways in which the practice of design and its outcomes can have a dark side, even when the intention is to design for the public good. Considering a range of designed objects and relationships, including guns, eyewear, assisted suicide kits, anti-rape devices, passports and prisons, the contributors offer a view of design as both progressive and problematic, able to propose new material and human relationships, yet also constrained by social norms and ideology.

      This contradictory, tricky quality of design is explored in the editors’ introduction, which positions the objects, systems, services and ‘things’ discussed in the book in relation to the idea of the trickster that occurs in anthropological literature, as well as in classical thought, discussing design interventions that have positive and negative ethical consequences. These will include objects, both material and ‘immaterial’, systems with both local and global scope, and also different processes of designing.

      This important new volume brings a fresh perspective to the complex nature of ‘things’, and makes a truly original contribution to debates in design ethics, design philosophy and material culture.