Bloomsbury Design Library
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eBooks

72 eBooks

      21st Century Lighting Design

      Author(s):

      Alyn Griffiths

      Lights fascinate. From functionality to style, the design of lighting is an area of design that is in a constant state of flux, with technologies allowing designers to now create lighting that can now manipulate and play with form, establishing the discipline to hold a place very much at the forefront of interior design and architecture.

      The book maps trends in lighting design over the last decade, featuring over 100 designs from domestic, commercial and architectural settings. This beautifully-designed and lavishly-illustrated volume features designs from a vast array of designers and agencies from influential figures including Ross Lovegrove, Ingo Maurer, Philippe Starck, Ron Arad and Tom Dixon to newly-emerging designers.

      As well as showcasing the most innovative and aesthetically bold work in the field, Alyn Griffiths’ carefully curated survey also provides a strong critical framework for understanding lighting design from the perspectives of sustainability, technology, form and structure.

      With full colour imagery and insightful commentary this is the ultimate guide to the diverse world of contemporary lighting design.

      A John Heskett Reader brings together key selected writings from the work of the design historian John Heskett. It will be edited and introduced by Clive Dilnot. John Heskett was a pioneering design historian whose work was foundational for the study of industrial design and the relationship between design, design policy, and economic value. Heskett was British but lived and taught in the United States and Hong Kong for a number of years. The Reader represents the range of Heskett's contribution to the field of design history and key concerns in his work: the relationship between design and economic value; design in history and the history of design; design policy, and design and economics. The anthology includes unpublished, hard to access and out-of-print material as well as extracts from classic and foundational works by Heskett. Included are major extracts from two unpublished books: ‘Crafts, Commerce and Industry’ and ‘Economic Value of Design’, which show Heskett's interest in exploring design and making and their relationship to economic value across the entirety of human history. Extracts are grouped into thematic sections with editorial introductions written by Clive Dilnot and other leading design historians.

      Amateur Craft

      History and Theory

      Author(s):

      Stephen Knott

      Amateur Craft provides an illuminating and historically-grounded account of amateur craft in the modern era, from 19th-century Sunday painters and amateur carpenters to present day railway modellers and yarnbombers. Stephen Knott's fascinating study explores the curious and unexpected attributes of things made outside standardised models of mass production, arguing that amateur craft practice is ‘differential’ – a temporary moment of control over work that both departs from and informs our productive engagement with the world.

      Knott's discussion of the theoretical aspects of amateur craft practice is substantiated by historical case studies that cluster around the period 1850–1950. Looking back to the emergence of the modern amateur, he makes reference to contemporary art and design practice that harnesses or exploits amateur conditions of making. From Andy Warhol to Simon Starling, such artistic interest elucidates the mercurial qualities of amateur craft.

      Invaluable for students and researchers in art and design, contemporary craft, material culture and social history, Amateur Craft counters both the marginalisation and the glorification of amateur craft practice. It is richly illustrated with 55 images, 14 in colour, including 19th century ephemera and works of contemporary art.

      How have architecture and design been represented in popular culture? How do these fictional reflections feed back into and influence 'the real world'? Archi.Pop: Architecture and Design in Popular Culture offers the first contemporary critical overview of this diverse and intriguing relationship in cultural forms including television, cinema, iconic buildings and everyday interiors, music and magazines.

      Bringing the study of architecture and culture firmly to the contemporary world, Archi.Pop offers a unique critical investigation into how this dynamic relationship has shaped the way we live and the way we interact with the constructed world around us.

      Art, Time and Technology

      Author(s):

      Charlie Gere

      Art, Time and Technology examines the role of art in an age of ‘real time‘ information systems and instantaneous communication. The increasing speed of technology and of technological development since the early nineteenth century has resulted in cultural anxiety. Humankind now appears to be an ever-smaller component of dauntingly complex technological systems, operating at speeds beyond human control or even perception. This perceived change forces us to rethink our understanding of key concepts such as time, history and art. Art, Time and Technology explores how the practice of art - in particular of avant-garde art - keeps our relation to time, history and even our own humanity open. Examining key moments in the history of both technology and art from the beginnings of industrialization to today, Charlie Gere explores both the making and purpose of art, and how much further it can travel from the human body.

      Beautiful Thing presents a broad introduction to design theory and practice. Historical, contextual, philosophical, technical, visual, and practical approaches to Design are often presented separately. But each approach impacts on others and together they are critical to a rounded understanding of design. Beautiful Thing presents a clear synthesis of these approaches, explaining all the basic concepts and allowing the reader to connect the different elements of Design.

      Both lively and accessible, the book takes the reader step by step through the key topics of taste, design evolution, composition, colour, drawing, communication and expression. Superbly illustrated, the book includes a range of detailed design case studies. In addition, theory boxes summarise necessary but complex ideas. A Glossary and Guides to Further Reading are also included. The book will be invaluable as a broad introduction for students of all branches of Design.

      Becoming Human by Design

      Author(s):

      Tony Fry

      The last in Tony Fry’s celebrated trilogy of books continues his radical rethinking of design. Becoming Human by Design’s provocative argument presents a revised reading of human ‘evolution’ centred on ontological design.

      Examining the relation of design to the nature of the human species - where the species came from, how it was created, what it became and its likely future - Fry asserts that current biological and social models of evolution are an insufficient explanation of how ‘we humans’ became what we are.

      Making a case for ontological design as an evolutionary agency, the book posits the relation between the formation of the world of human fabrication and the making of mankind itself as indivisible. It also functions as a provocation to rethink the fate of Homo sapiens, recognising that all species are finite and that the fate of humankind turns on a fundamental Darwinian principle - adapt or die. Fry considers the nature of adaptation, arguing that it will depend on an ability to think and design in new ways.

      Title Description: British Design brings together leading international scholars, designers and journalists to provide new perspectives on British design in the last sixty years, and how it at once looked back to the past with the continuation of traditions that spoke to Britain's design heritage, and looked forwards with the embrace of modernist and postmodernist style. The book responds to and develops new ways of understanding the recent history of design in Britain, with case studies on designed spaces and objects, including domestic interiors, retail spaces, schools and university buildings and transport.

      The contributors address significant moments and phenomena in the historical and social history of British design, from the rise and fall of the English Country House style and the Brutalist architectural boom of the 1960s to the modern shopping space, and consider the work of key contemporary designers ranging from Tommy Roberts to Thomas Heatherwick. British Design provides new criticism and analysis on how design, from the immediate post-war period to the present day, has developed and changed how we live and how we interact with the spaces in which we live.

      British Design is split into 13 chapters and is richly illustrated with 65 images, 16 of which are in full colour.

      Contemporary Crafts

      Author(s):

      Imogen Racz

      Contemporary Crafts explores craft practices in both North America and Britain, revealing an astonishingly rich and diverse picture of artisanal work today.

      The book ranges across both urban and rural crafts and analyses how the country/city dichotomy creates differing approaches, practices and objects. Analysed in the context of their environment and its localised history, crafted objects are shown to embody or critique particular urban/rural myths and traditions.

      Covering both traditional and cutting-edge crafts from the small-scale domestic to large outdoor works, Contemporary Crafts demonstrates how craftspeople today are responding to the changing creative contexts of culture and history.

      Critical Design is becoming an increasingly influential discipline, affecting policy and practice in a range of fields. Matt Malpass’s book is the first to introduce critical design as a field, providing a history of the discipline, outlining its key influences, theories and approaches, and explaining how critical design can work in practice through a range of contemporary examples. Critical Design moves away from traditional approaches that limit design’s role to the production of profitable objects, focusing instead on a practice that is interrogative, discursive and experimental. Using a wide range of examples from contemporary practice, and drawing on interviews with key practitioners, Matt Malpass provides an introduction to critical design practice and a manifesto for how a radical and unorthodox practice might provide design answers in an age of austerity and ecological crisis.

      Danish Modern

      Between Art and Design

      Author(s):

      Mark Mussari

      Danish Modern explores the development of mid-century modernist design in Denmark from historical, analytical and theoretical perspectives. Mark Mussari explores the relationship between Danish design aesthetics and the theoretical and cultural impact of Modernism, particularly between 1930 and 1960. He considers how Danish designers responded to early Modernist currents: the Stockholm Exhibition of 1930, their rejection of Bauhaus aesthetic demands, their early fealty to wood and materials, and the tension between cabinetmaker craft and industrial production as it challenged and altered their aesthetic approach. Tracing the theoretical foundations for these developments, Mussari discusses the writings and works of such figures as Poul Henningsen, Arne Jacobsen, Hans Wegner, Nanna Ditzel, and Finn Juhl.

      Design and Creativity

      Policy, Management and Practice

      Editor(s):

      Guy Julier and Liz Moor

      Design and other creative industries not only shape our lives in numerous ways, providing ‘cultural’ goods such as films, music and magazines, but also shape the look and feel of everyday objects and spaces. The creative industries are also important economically; governments and businesses now make considerable efforts to manage creativity for a range of political and economic ends. Does the management of design conflict with traditional ideas of creative freedom and autonomy? How do government policies and business priorities influence the day-to-day practices of designers? And how far have the processes and purpose of creative work been changed by its new centrality to business and government? Bringing together case studies and material from a range of industries and contexts, as well as a series of interviews with practitioners, Design and Creativity provides a cutting-edge account of key trends in the creative industries at the start of the twenty-first century.

      Design and National Identity

      Author(s):

      Javier Gimeno-Martínez

      This important study introduces the key theories of national identity, and relates them to the broad fields of product, graphic and fashion design.

      Javier Gimeno-Martinez approaches the inter-relationship between national identity and cultural production from two perspectives: the distinctive characteristics of a nation's output, and the consumption of design products within a country as a means of generating a national design landscape. Using case studies ranging from stamps in nineteenth century Russian-occupied Finland, to Coca-Cola as an ‘American’ drink in modern Trinidad and Tobago, he addresses concepts of essentialism, constructivism, geography and multiculturality, and considers the works of key theorists, including Benedict Anderson, Eric Hobsbawm and Doreen Massey.

      This illuminating book offers the first comprehensive account of how national identity and cultural policy have shaped design, while suggesting that traditional formations of the ‘national’ are increasingly unsustainable in an age of globalisation, migration and cultural diversity.

      Design and the Creation of Value

      Author(s):

      John Heskett, Clive Dilnot and Suzan Boztepe

      John Heskett was a leading design historian with a particular interest in design and economics. This book publishes for the first time his writings on design and economic value, and design’s role in creating value in organisations and products.

      The first part of Heskett’s text introduces the main traditions of economic thought as they explain the relationship between producers, markets, products and consumers; he then goes on to consider the importance of design and design thinking in innovating and creating value in business practice and product development.

      Heskett refers to examples of businesses such as Dyson and Apple that have successfully responded to the value of design in their practice, and others such as the Ford Motor Company that were faced with the threat of bankruptcy because they failed to encourage innovation and creativity or to respond adequately to the challenges and opportunities presented by new technology.

      Heskett’s text is accompanied by critical and contextualising overviews by leading design scholars, which place Heskett's writings within the framework of contemporary design and business thought and practice.

      Design and the Question of History

      Author(s):

      Tony Fry, Clive Dilnot and Susan C. Stewart

      Design and the Question of History is not a work of Design History. Rather, it is a mixture of mediation, advocacy and polemic that takes seriously the directive force of design as an historical actor in and upon the world. Understanding design as a shaper of worlds within which the political, ethical and historical character of human being is at stake, this text demands radically transformed notions of both design and history. Above all, the authors posit history as the generational site of the future. Blindness to history, it is suggested, blinds us both to possibility, and to the foreclosure of possibilities, enacted through our designing.

      The text is not a resolved, continuous work, presented through one voice. Rather, the three authors cut across each other, presenting readers with the task of disclosing, to themselves, the commonalities, repetitions and differences within the deployed arguments, issues, approaches and styles from which the text is constituted. This is a work of friendship, of solidarity in difference, an act of cultural politics. It invites the reader to take a position – it seeks engagement over agreement.

      Design as Future-Making

      Editor(s):

      Susan Yelavich and Barbara Adams

      Design as Future-Making brings together leading international designers, scholars, and critics to address ways in which design is shaping the future. The contributors share an understanding of design as a practice that, with its focus on innovation and newness, is a natural ally of futurity. Ultimately, the choices made by designers are understood here as choices about the kind of world we want to live in. Design as Future-Making locates design in a space of creative and critical reflection, examining the expanding nature of practice in fields such as biomedicine, sustainability, digital crafting, fashion, architecture, urbanism, and design activism.

      The authors contextualize design and its affects within issues of social justice, environmental health, political agency, education, and the right to pleasure and play. Collectively, they make the case that, as an integrated mode of thought and action, design is intrinsically social and deeply political.

      Design As Politics

      Author(s):

      Tony Fry

      Design as Politics confronts the inadequacy of contemporary politics to deal with unsustainability. Current 'solutions' to unsustainability are analysed as utterly insufficient for dealing with the problems but, further than this, the book questions the very ability of democracy to deliver a sustainable future.

      Design as Politics argues that finding solutions to this problem, of which climate change is only one part, demands original and radical thinking. Rather than reverting to failed political ideologies, the book proposes a post-democratic politics. In this, Design occupies a major role, not as it is but as it could be if transformed into a powerful agent of change, a force to create and extend freedom. The book does no less than position Design as a vital form of political action.

      Design By Ikea

      A Cultural History

      Author(s):

      Sara Kristoffersson

      Sara Kristoffersson's compelling study provides the first sustained critical history of IKEA. Kristoffersson argues that the company's commercial success has been founded on a neat alignment of the brand with a particular image of Swedish national identity – one that is bound up with ideas of social democracy and egalitarianism - and its material expression in a pared-down, functional design aesthetic. Employing slogans such as “Design for everyone” and “Democratic design”, IKEA signals a rejection of the stuffy, the 'chintzy', and the traditional in both design practices and social structures.

      Drawing on original research in the IKEA company archive and interviews with IKEA personnel, Design by IKEA traces IKEA's symbolic connection to Sweden, through its design output and its promotional materials, to examine how the company both promoted and profited from the concept of Scandinavian Design.

      Sustainability is now a buzzword both among professionals and scholars. However, though climate change and resource depletion are now widely recognized by business as major challenges, and while new practices like ‘green design’ have emerged, efforts towards change remain weak and fragmented. Exposing these limitations, Design Futuring systematically presents ideas and methods for Design as an expanded ethical and professional practice. Design Futuring argues that responding to ethical, political, social and ecological concerns now requires a new type of practice that recognizes design’s importance in overcoming a world made unsustainable. Illustrated throughout with international case material, Design Futuring presents the author’s ground-breaking ideas in a coherent framework, focusing specifically on the ways in which concerns for ethics and sustainability can change the practice of Design for the twenty-first century. Design Futuring - a pathfinding text for the new era - extends far beyond Design courses and professional practice, and will also be invaluable to students and practitioners of Architecture, the Creative Arts, Business and Management.

      Design History has become a complex and wide-ranging discipline. It now examines artefacts from conception to development, production, mediation, and consumption. Over the last few decades, the discipline has developed a diverse range of theories and methodologies for the analysis of objects. Design History presents the most comprehensive overview and guide to these developments.

      The book first traces the development of the discipline, explaining how it draws from Art History, Industrial Design, Cultural History and Material Culture Studies. The core of the book then analyses the seminal methodologies used in Design History today. The final section highlights the key issues concerning knowledge and meaning in Design. Throughout, the aim is to present a concise and accessible introduction to this complex field.

      A map to the intellectual landscape of Design History, the book will be an invaluable guide for students and a very useful reference for scholars.

      Design Objects and The Museum

      Editor(s):

      Liz Farrelly and Joanna Weddell

      Design Objects and the Museum brings together leading design historians, curators, educators and archivists drawing on a wide range of 20th century and contemporary examples from international museums to consider how contemporary design objects have been curated and displayed within and beyond the museum.

      Current government agendas on culture and education may stress global competition but should high quality design objects be preserved as reified cultural products, or, alternatively, studied as examples of industrial process? Does contemporary design, which is often ephemeral or ‘process-based’, stretch or strain the collecting and display procedures of the museum? And, in a world of multiple choices, is there still a need for the museum to promote ‘good design’ to the public?

      The volume begins with the post-war context for design initiatives and exhibitions and continues to the contemporary scene, providing historical perspective on material culture and assessing current developments and trends. The first section relates to the notion of the ‘canon’ of art history and, by implication, museological practice and issues that arise when placing design within museums, progressing through post-war concepts of ‘good design’ to design today. Section 2 discusses the positioning of contemporary design within and beyond the art gallery, national museum, commercial space and design museum, extending debates about design versus art. The final section examines the challenges presented by contemporary design to interpretation and learning in the museum, and the role of curators, exhibition designers and visitors in shaping experience and creating meaning

      Design thinking is the core creative process for any designer; this book explores and explains this apparently mysterious “design ability.”

      Focusing on what designers do when they design, Design Thinking is structured around a series of in-depth case studies of outstanding and expert designers, interwoven with overviews and analyses. The range covered reflects the breadth of design, from hardware and software design to architecture and Formula One. The book offers new insights into and understanding of design thinking, based on evidence from observation and investigation of design practice.

      Design Thinking is the distillation of the work of one of design’s most influential scholars. Nigel Cross goes to the heart of what it means to think and work as a designer. The book is an ideal guide for anyone who wants to be a designer or to know how good designers work in the field of contemporary design.

      Design: Critical and Primary Sources brings together 100 essential texts on design from the mid 19th century to the present day, covering key thinkers, movements and issues for design. The four volumes focus on:

      1) Design Reform, Modernism and Modernization

      2) Professional Practice and Design Theories

      3) Social Interactions

      4) Development, Globalization and Sustainability

      Each volume features an editorial introduction and articles are grouped into thematic sections within the volume.

      Design: Critical and Primary Sources brings together 100 essential texts on design from the mid 19th century to the present day, covering key thinkers, movements and issues for design. The four volumes focus on:

      1) Design Reform, Modernism and Modernization

      2) Professional Practice and Design Theories

      3) Social Interactions

      4) Development, Globalization and Sustainability

      Each volume features an editorial introduction and articles are grouped into thematic sections within the volume.

      Design: Critical and Primary Sources brings together 100 essential texts on design from the mid 19th century to the present day, covering key thinkers, movements and issues for design. The four volumes focus on:

      1) Design Reform, Modernism and Modernization

      2) Professional Practice and Design Theories

      3) Social Interactions

      4) Development, Globalization and Sustainability

      Each volume features an editorial introduction and articles are grouped into thematic sections within the volume.

      Design: Critical and Primary Sources brings together 100 essential texts on design from the mid 19th century to the present day, covering key thinkers, movements and issues for design. The four volumes focus on:

      1) Design Reform, Modernism and Modernization

      2) Professional Practice and Design Theories

      3) Social Interactions

      4) Development, Globalization and Sustainability

      Each volume features an editorial introduction and articles are grouped into thematic sections within the volume.

      Designing for Service

      Key Issues and New Directions

      Editor(s):

      Daniela Sangiorgi and Alison Prendiville

      Service design is the activity of planning and organizing people, infrastructure, communication and material components of a service in order to improve its quality and the interaction between service provider and customers. It is now a growing field of both practice and academic research. Designing for Service brings together a wide range of international contributors to map the field of service design and identify key issues for practitioners and researchers such as identity, ethics and accountability. Designing for Service aims to problematize the field in order to inform a more critical debate within service design, thereby supporting its development beyond the pure methodological discussions that currently dominate the field. The contributors to this innovative volume consider the practice of service design, ethical challenges designers may encounter, and the new spaces opened up by the advent of modern digital technologies.

      Designing the French Interior: The Modern Home and Mass Media

      Author(s):

      Anca I. Lasc, Georgina Downey and Mark Taylor

      Title Description: Designing the French Interior traces France’s central role in the development of the modern domestic interior, from the pre-revolutionary period to the 1970s, and addresses the importance of various media, including drawings, prints, pattern books, illustrated magazines, department store catalogs, photographs, guidebooks, and films, in representing and promoting French interior design to a wider audience. Contributors to this original volume identify and historicize the singularity of the modern French domestic interior as a generator of reproducible images, a site for display of both highly crafted and mass-produced objects, and the direct result of widely-circulated imagery in its own right. This important volume enables an invaluable new understanding of the relationship between architecture, interior spaces, material cultures, mass media and modernity.

      When and why did the turntable morph from playback device to musical instrument? Why have mobile phones evolved changeable skins? How many meanings can one attach to such mundane things as tennis balls? The answers to such questions illustrate this provocative book, which examines the cultural meanings of things and the role of designers in their design and production.

      Designing Things provides the reader with a map of the rapidly changing field of design studies, a subject which now draws on a diverse range of theories and methodologies - from philosophy and visual culture, to anthropology and material culture, to media and cultural studies.

      With clear explanations of key concepts - such as form language, planned obsolescence, object fetishism, product semantics, consumer value and user needs - overviews of theoretical foundations and case studies of historical and contemporary objects, Designing Things looks behind-the-scenes and beneath-the-surface at some of our most familiar and iconic objects.

      Designing: Business and Management

      Editor(s):

      Sabine Junginger and Jürgen Faust

      Scholars and practitioners from management and design address the challenges and issues of designing business from a design perspective. Designing Business and Management combines practical models and grounded theories to improve organizations by design. For designing managers and managing designers, the book offers visual and conceptual models as well as theoretical concepts that connect the practice of designing with the activities of changing, organizing and managing. The book zooms in on designing beyond products and services. It focuses on designing businesses with a particular onus on social business and social entrepreneurship.

      Designing Business and Management contributes to and enhances the discourse between leading design and management scholars; offers a first outline of issues, concepts, practices, methods and principles that currently represent the body of knowledge pertaining to designing business, with a special focus on perceiving business as a social activity; and explores the practices of designing and managing, their commonalities, distinctions and boundaries.

      Developing Citizen Designers

      Author(s):

      Elizabeth Resnick

      The aim of this book is to enable students, educators and designers in the early stages of their careers to learn and practise design in a socially responsible manner. It responds to the rise of academic debate and teaching in the areas of social design, sustainable design, ethical design and design futures. Citizen Designers is a practically and pedagogically focused book, with each chapter addressing a particular area or issue within design practice and education, with an overview framing essay, interviews with practitioners and educators, and assignment briefs through which the reader can understand the process by which a brief is set, met and critiqued.

      Digital design

      A critical introduction

      Author(s):

      Dean Bruton and Antony Radford

      Digital Design: A Critical Introduction provides a much-needed new perspective on designing with digital media. Linking ideas from media theory, generative design and creativity with examples from nature, art, architecture, industrial design, websites, animation and games, it addresses some fundamental questions about creative design with digital media.

      Featuring original material based on the authors' own research, the book argues that the recognition and understanding of the interplay of the two apparently opposing concepts of rules and contingency supports original thinking, creativity and innovation.

      Going beyond existing texts on the subject, Digital Design is an accessible primer whose innovative approach transcends the analysis of individual subfields - such as animation, games and website design - yet offers practical help within all of them.

      Doing Research in Design

      Author(s):

      Christopher Crouch and Jane Pearce

      Doing Research in Design presents new ways of thinking about the relationship between design and research by positioning design as a social as well as a material practice. This approach emphasises the social consequences of design decisions as well as the importance of the efficient functioning of a design.

      Doing Research in Design argues that design promotes social change and that, in order to understand that change, designers must turn to social science research methods. The book outlines the relationships between thinking and doing in design - and makes explicit links between design, research, philosophy and sociology - and then examines four central social research methodologies in practice.

      The aim of Doing Research in Design is to provide anyone involved in the field of design with the knowledge and understanding of the best methods to plan and conduct their research.

      In the act of enclosing space and making rooms, we make and define our aspirations and identities.

      Taking a room by room approach, this fascinating volume explores how representations of domestic space have embodied changing spatial configurations and values, and considers how we see modern individuals in the process of making themselves ‘at home’.

      Scholars from the US, UK and Australasia re-visit and re-think interiors by Bonnard, Matisse, Degas and Vuillard, as well as the great spaces of early modernity; the drawing room in Rossetti’s house, hallways in Hampstead Garden Suburb, the Paris attic of the Brothers Goncourt; Schütte-Lihotzky’s Frankfurt Kitchen, to explore how interior making has changed from the Victorian to the modern period.

      From the smallest room - the bathroom - to the spacious verandas of Singapore Deco, Domestic Interiors focuses on modern rooms ‘imaged’ and imagined, it builds a distinct body of knowledge around the interior, interiority, representation and modernity, and creates a rich resource for students and scholars in art, architecture and design history.

      How can we design better experiences? Experience Design brings together leading international scholars to provide a cross-section of critical thinking and professional practice within this emerging field. Contributors writing from theoretical, empirical and applied design perspectives address the meaning of ‘experience’; draw on case studies to explore ways in which specific ‘experiences’ can be designed; examine which methodologies and practices are employed in this process; and consider how experience design interrelates with other academic and professional disciplines.

      Chapters are grouped into thematic sections addressing positions, objectives and environments, and interactions and performances, with individual case studies addressing a wide range of experiences, including urban spaces, the hospital patient, museum visitors, mobile phone users, and music festival and restaurant goers.

      Graphic Design in Urban Environments

      Author(s):

      Robert Harland

      Graphic Design in Urban Environments introduces the idea of a category of designed graphic objects that significantly contribute to the functioning of urban systems. These elements, smaller than buildings, are generally understood by urban designers to comprise such phenomena as sculpture, clock towers, banners, signs, large screens, the portrayal of images on buildings through “smart screens,” and other examples of what urban designers call “urban objects.” The graphic object as it is defined here also refers to a range of familiar things invariably named in the literature as maps, street numbers, route signs, bus placards, signs, architectural communication, commercial vernacular, outdoor publicity, lettering, banners, screens, traffic and direction signs and street furniture. One can also add markings of a sports pitch, lighting, bollards, even red carpets or well dressings.

      By looking at the environment, and design and deconstructing form and context relationships, the defining properties and configurational patterns that make up graphic objects are shown in this book to link the smallest graphic detail (e.g. the number 16) to larger symbolic statements (e.g. the Empire State Building). From a professional design practice perspective, a cross section through type, typographic, graphic and urban design will provide a framework for considering the design transition between alphabets, writing systems, images (in the broadest sense) and environments.

      Iconic Designs

      50 Stories about 50 Things

      Editor(s):

      Grace Lees-Maffei

      Iconic Designs is a beautifully designed and illustrated guide to fifty classic ‘things’ – designs that we find in the city, in our homes and offices, on page and screen, and in our everyday lives. In her introduction, Grace Lees-Maffei explores the idea of iconicity and what makes a design ‘iconic’, and fifty essays by leading design and cultural critics address the development of each iconic ‘thing’, its innovative and unique qualities, and its journey to classic status.

      Subjects range from the late 19th century to the present day, and include the Sydney Opera House, the Post-It Note, Coco Chanel’s classic suit, the Sony Walkman™, Hello Kitty™, Helvetica, the Ford Model T, Harry Beck’s diagrammatic map of the London Underground and the Apple iMac G3.

      This handsome volume provides a treasure trove of 'stories' that will shed new light on the iconic designs that we use without thinking, aspire to possess, love or hate (or love to hate) and which form part of the fabric of our everyday lives.

      Love Objects

      Emotion, Design and Material Culture

      Editor(s):

      Anna Moran and Sorcha O’Brien

      How are love and emotion embodied in material form?

      Love Objects explores the emotional potency of things, addressing how objects can function as fetishes, symbols and representations, active participants in and mediators of our relationships, as well as tokens of affection, symbols of virility, triggers of nostalgia, replacements for lost loved ones, and symbols of lost places and times.

      Addressing both designed 'things with attitude' and the 'wild things' of material culture, Love Objects explores a wide range of objects, from 19th-century American portraits displaying men's passionate friendships to the devotional and political meanings of religious statues in 1920s Ireland.

      Made in Italy

      Rethinking a Century of Italian Design

      Editor(s):

      Grace Lees-Maffei and Kjetil Fallan

      Goods made or designed in Italy enjoy a profile which far outstrips the country's modest manufacturing output. Italy's glorious design heritage and reputation for style and innovation has 'added value' to products made in Italy. Since 1945, Italian design has commanded an increasing amount of attention from design journalists, critics and consumers. But is Italian design a victim of its own celebrity? Made in Italy brings together leading design historians to explore this question, discussing both the history and significance of design from Italy and its international influence. Addressing a wide range of Italian design fields, including car design, graphic design, industrial and interior design and ceramics, well-known designers such as Alberto Rosselli and Ettore Sottsass, Jr. and iconic brands such as Olivetti, Vespa and Alessi, the book explores the historical, cultural and social influences that shaped Italian design, and how these iconic designs have contributed to the modern canon of Italian-inspired goods.

      Scandinavia is a region associated with modernity: modern design, modern living and a modern welfare state. This new history of modernism in Scandinavia offers a picture of the complex reality that lies behind the label: a modernism made up of many different figures, impulses and visions. It places the individuals who have achieved international fame, such as Edvard Munch and Alvar Aalto in a wider context, and through a series of case studies, provides a rich analysis of the art, architecture and design history of the Nordic region, and of modernism as a concept and mode of practice.

      Scandinavian Modern addresses the decades between 1890 and 1970 and presents an intertwined history of modernism across the region. Charlotte Ashby gives a rationale for her focus on those countries which share an interrelated history and colonial past, but also stresses influences from outside the region, such as the English Arts and Crafts movement and the impact of emergent American modernism. Her richly illustrated account guides the reader through key historical periods and cultural movements, with case studies illuminating key art works, buildings, designed products and exhibitions.

      Taking as its point of departure Roland Barthes’ classic series of essays, Mythologies, Rebecca Houze presents an exploration of signs and symbols in the visual landscape of postmodernity. In nine chapters Houze considers a range of contemporary phenomena, from the history of sustainability to the meaning of sports and children’s building toys. Among the ubiquitous global trademarks she examines are BP, McDonald’s, and Nike. What do these icons say to us today? What political and ideological messages are hidden beneath their surfaces? Taking the idea of myth in its broadest sense, the individual case studies employ a variety of analytic methods derived from linguistics, psychoanalysis, anthropology, sociology, and art history. In their eclecticism of approach they demonstrate the interdisciplinarity of design history and design studies.

      Just as Barthes’ meditations on culture concentrated on his native France, New Mythologies is rooted in the author’s experience of living and teaching in the United States. Houze’s reflections encompass both contemporary American popular culture and the history of American industry, with reference to such foundational figures as Thomas Jefferson and Walt Disney. The collection provides a point of entry into today’s complex postmodern or post-postmodern world, and suggests some ways of thinking about its meanings, and the lessons we might learn from it.

      Performance, Fashion and The Modern Interior

      From the Victorians to Today

      Editor(s):

      Fiona Fisher, Patricia Lara-Betancourt, Trevor Keeble and Brenda Martin

      Performance, Fashion and the Modern Interior examines the interior as a stage upon which modern life and lifestyles are consciously fashioned and performed, and from which modern identities are projected by and through design.

      Scholars from Europe, Canada, America and Australia present a range of interior environments - domestic interiors, sets for stage and film, exhibition spaces, art galleries, hotel lobbies, cafés and retail spaces - to explore each as an intersection of fashion, lifestyle and performance. Sharing the thesis that the fashionably-dressed body and the interior can be seen as part of the same creative and expressive continuum, the essays highlight the ways in which interiors can give shape to and dramatise modern life.

      Practice-based Design Research

      Editor(s):

      Laurene Vaughan

      Practice-based Design Research provides a companion to masters and PhD programs in design research through practice. The contributors address a range of models and approaches to practice-based research, consider relationships between industry and academia, researchers and designers, discuss initiatives to support students and faculty during the research process, and explore how students’ experiences of undertaking practice-based research has impacted their future design and research practice. The text is illustrated throughout with case study examples by authors who have set up, taught or undertaken practice-based design research, in a range of national and institutional contexts.

      Prototype

      Design and Craft in the 21st Century

      Author(s):

      Louise Valentine

      Design in the 21st century has become increasingly more embedded in a complex system of disciplines (software and digital design, graphic design, architecture, construction, medical practices, business design and management, technology, graphic design, product design, etc.) and as a result, the intricacies of designing a product have increased. How can NASA test products for alien environments on Earth? How can a designer successfully test a digital program for a space that is not tangible? It is these problems that this collection responds to, allowing the reader to understand the significance of the prototype in modern design, and how designers must use this process to predict the potential future of their product. Prototype enables design students and professionals to explore the significance of the prototype and its influence and bearing on the future of design. As the prototype is a model of something not yet built, a kind of future in the present, its importance in the development of the finished product cannot be ignored. It allows designers to understand what needs to be changed and what needs to be manipulated in order to create a product that successfully understands and navigates all the complexities of the modern world. In this way, the book allows us to rethink the nature of the prototype for the 21st century and beyond.

      Retro Style

      Class, Gender and Design in the Home

      Author(s):

      Sarah Elsie Baker

      Retro interiors have come to the fore in recent years as a highly desirable and valuable branch of interior design. The emergence of a need for decorative objects and vintage furniture has resurrected retro style and placed it firmly as a key trend of contemporary design.

      Retro Style: Class, Gender and Design in the Home is the first book to explore the modern position of retro by asking important questions around the emergence of the trend, its impact on production and consumption and how it manifests itself in the contemporary interior. Examining themes ranging from design, taste and the aestheticisation of everyday life to the bohemianisation of popular culture, the book provides a fascinating insight into how retro has shaped modern interior design.

      Using original ethnographic research from retro retailers, enthusiasts, designers and media professionals Retro Style explores the positive and negative side of the style, ultimately providing an original and thought-provoking perspective on the history and trajectory of how retro has become what it now is and its bearing on the future of designed interiors.

      Robert Stewart Design 1946–95

      Author(s):

      Liz Arthur

      Robert Stewart was one of the foremost British designers of the second half of the 20th century. He and Lucienne Day dominated the design field at that time with Libertys and Heals having a pact that Stewart would design exclusively for Libertys while Day designed for Heals. Stewart’s time was divided between teaching at the Glasgow School of Art and producing innovative designs for textiles and ceramics. This book is a celebration of Bob Stewart - his life and achievements - as well as a fascinating snapshot of the British design world in the decades after World War II. This is an important work that will bring to public notice the master who, along with Lucienne Day, dazzled the design world in the 1950s and 1960s.

      Scandinavian Design

      Alternative Histories

      Editor(s):

      Kjetil Fallan

      Scandinavian design is still seen as democratic, functional and simple, its products exemplifying the same characteristics now as they have done since the 1950s. But both the essence and the history of Scandinavian design are much more complex than this. Scandinavian Design: Alternative Histories presents a radically new assessment, a corrective to the persistent mythologies and reductive accounts of Scandinavian design.

      The book brings together case studies from the early twentieth century to today. Drawn from fields as diverse as transport, engineering, packaging, photography, law, interiors, and corporate identity, these studies tell new or unfamiliar stories about the production, mediation and consumption of design. An alternative history is created, one much more alive to national and regional differences and to types of product.

      Scandinavian Design analyses a century of design culture from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden and, in so doing, presents a sophisticated introduction to Scandinavian design.

      Sloppy Craft

      Postdisciplinarity and the Crafts

      Editor(s):

      Elaine Cheasley Paterson and Susan Surette

      Sloppy Craft: Postdisciplinarity and the Crafts brings together leading international artists and critics to explore the possibilities and limitations of the idea of ‘sloppy craft’ – craft that is messy or unfinished looking in its execution or appearance, or both. The contributors address ‘sloppiness’ in contemporary art and craft practices including painting, weaving, sewing and ceramics, consider the importance of traditional concepts of skill, and the implications of sloppiness for a new 21st century emphasis on inter- and postdisciplinarity, as well as for activist, performance, queer and Aboriginal practices.

      In addition to critical essays, the book includes a ‘conversation’ section in which contemporary artists and practitioners discuss challenges and opportunities of ‘sloppy craft’ in their practice and teaching, and an afterword by Glenn Adamson.

      Steel

      A Design, Cultural and Ecological History

      Author(s):

      Tony Fry and Anne-Marie Willis

      Steel has, over centuries, played a crucial role in shaping our material, and in particular, urban landscapes. This books undertakes a cultural and ecological history of the material, examining the relationship between steel and design at a micro and macro level – in terms of both what it has been used to design and how it has functioned as a ‘world-making force’, necessary to the development of technologies and ideas.

      The research for the book is informed by diverse fields of literature including industry journals, contemporary accounts and technical literature – all framed by rich, early accounts of iron and steel making from the middle ages to the opening of the industrial age, and most notably, the crucial works of Vannoccio Biringuccio, Georgius Agricola, Andrew Ure and Harry Scrivenor.

      In contrast, trans-cultural accounts of the history of metallurgy from eminent sinologists and cultural historians like Joseph Neeham and G.E.R. Lloyd are used. Readings on the pre-history and history of science, as well as histories and philosophies technology from scholars such as Siegfried Giedion, Merritt Roe Smith, L.T.C Rolt, Robert B. Gordon inform the analysis. Social and economic history from historians such as Eric Hobsbawn, William T. Hogan and David Brody are consulted; labour process theory is also examined, particularly the influential writings of F.W. Taylor in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and his contemporary critics, like David Nobel and Harry Braverman. Many other disciples also inform the account: histories of urban design and architecture, transport and military history, environmental history and geography.

      Eleanor Herring’s unique study of street furniture design in post-war Britain considers how objects which are now familiar parts of our urban environment – lampposts, post boxes, parking meters, litterbins and signage – were designed to populate public spaces. Herring explores the context of a post-war government, backed by various bodies keen to propagate ‘good’ modern design in a Britain whose towns and cities had been laid waste by bombing and the privations of war.

      She also considers the innate conservatism of local communities and councils, wary of a standardised street design imposed from above. She traces how the design of street furniture became the site of a fierce struggle which exposed deep-seated anxieties about class, taste and power. Herring’s original research draws upon archival material and on interviews with leading figures in urban design, including the graphic designer Margaret Calvert and industrial designer Kenneth Grange.

      stripes, grids and checks

      Author(s):

      Michael Hann

      Stripes, Grids and Checks considers the nature of lines and assemblies of lines, including stripes and grids, as well as related phenomena such as checks, tilings and patterns, regular and irregular, repeating and non-repeating. A wide range of examples are drawn from urban and rural environments, at the macro and micro levels, in land- and cityscapes, buildings, and other designed constructions, compositions and objects.

      Considered conventionally, checks, periodic tilings and regular patterns owe their compositional arrangements to an order imposed by an underlying grid structure. The intention in this book is to analyse, explain and illustrate the nature of each design type, to identify the structural (or geometric) similarities between each and to show how the manipulation of various underlying grid structures can provide innovative compositional frameworks for artists and designers.

      The discussion is richly illustrated with 400 black and white images and an eight page colour section.

      This book provides a critical examination of structure and form in design, covering a range of topics of great value to students and practitioners engaged in any of the specialist decorative arts and design disciplines. The complexities of two-dimensional phenomena are explained and illustrated in detail, while various three-dimensional forms are also discussed.

      In the context of the decorative arts and design, structure is the under lying framework, and form the resultant, visible, two- or three-dimensional outcome of the creative process. Whether hidden or visually detectable in the final design, structure invariably determines whether or not a design is successful in terms of both its aesthetics and its practical performance.

      Hann successfully identifies various geometric concepts, and presents and discusses a number of simple guidelines to assist the creative endeavours of both accomplished and student practitioners, teachers and researchers.

      There is little appreciation for what happens to graphic design artifacts after their useful life has ended. Sustainable Graphic Design outlines graphic design’s relationship to production and consumption, demonstrating how designers can contribute solution-oriented responses to consumption, through tools and methodologies applicable to both education and practice.

      The book provides an overview of sustainable graphic design, based on global engagement with design’s relationship to consumption, and features highly creative work inspired by complex issues and including studies of a variety of visual artifacts, the larger built environment and the very ordinary products of consumption.

      Presenting cutting-edge work in graphic design from practitioners, educators and students from North America, Northern Europe, Australia and the Far East, the book helps students visualize their future roles engaging with the field in response to ecological concerns, social justice and present systems of design by using extensive case studies of student work with step-by step instructions adapted for use by instructors.

      Symbol, Pattern and Symmetry: The Cultural Significance of Structure investigates how pattern and symbol has functioned in visual arts, exploring how connections and comparisons in geometrical pattern can be made across different cultures and how the significance of these designs has influenced craft throughout history.

      The book features illustrative examples of symbol and pattern from a wide range of historical and cultural contexts, from Byzantine, Persian and Assyrian design, to case studies of Japanese and Chinese patterns. Looking at each culture's specific craft style, Hann shows how the visual arts are underpinned with a strict geometric structure, and argues that understanding these underlying structures enables us to classify and compare data from across cultures and historical periods.

      Richly illustrated with both colour and black and white images, and with clear, original commentary, the book enables students, practitioners, teachers and researchers to explore the historical and cultural significance of symbol and pattern in craft and design, ultimately displaying how a geometrical dialogue in design can be established through history and culture

      The Architecture of David Lynch

      Author(s):

      Richard Martin

      From the Red Room in Twin Peaks to Club Silencio in Mulholland Drive, the work of David Lynch contains some of the most remarkable spaces in contemporary culture. Richard Martin’s compelling study is the first sustained critical assessment of the role architecture and design play in Lynch’s films. Martin combines original research at Lynchian locations in Los Angeles, London and Lódz with insights from architects including Adolf Loos, Le Corbusier and Jean Nouvel and urban theorists such as Jane Jacobs and Edward Soja. In analyzing the towns, cities, homes, roads and stages found in Lynch’s work, Martin not only reveals their central importance for understanding this controversial and distinctive film-maker, but also suggests how Lynch’s films can provide a deeper understanding of the places and spaces in which we live.

      The Banham Lectures

      Essays on Designing the Future

      Editor(s):

      Jeremy Aynsley and Harriet Atkinson

      The Banham Lectures presents a series of essays by leading critics on art, design, architecture and culture. All are inspired by the revolutionary work of Reyner Banham, who continues to be one of the greatest influences on Design and Architecture today. Integrating the study of pop art, industrial design and material culture for the first time, Banham’s brilliant analyses of subjects - such as automobile styling, mobile homes, science fiction films, and our fondness for gadgets - anticipated many of our contemporary preoccupations. And just as Banham sought to overturn the views of previous generations, these critics aim to rethink the objects and buildings we use today. Provocative, engaged and inspired, The Banham Lectures is essential reading for anyone interested in the world we have made. CONTRIBUTORS: Mary Banham, Paul Barker, Tim Benton, Beatriz Colomina, Peter Cook, Elizabeth Collins Cromley, Frank Dudas, Adrian Forty, Christopher Frayling, Richard Hamilton, Mark Haworth-Booth, Tom Karen Pat Kirkham, Tomas Maldonado, Jeffrey L. Meikle, Gillian Naylor, Cedric Price, Ruth Schwartz-Cowan, Charles Saumarez Smith, Penny Sparke

      The Design of Everyday Life

      Author(s):

      Elizabeth Shove, Matthew Watson, Martin Hand and Jack Ingram

      How do common household items such as basic plastic house wares or high-tech digital cameras transform our daily lives? The Design of Everyday Life considers this question in detail, from the design of products through to their use in the home. Drawing on interviews with consumers themselves, the authors look at how everyday objects, ranging from screwdrivers to photo management software, are used on a practical level. Closely investigating the design, production and use of mass-market goods, the authors offer new interpretations of how consumers’ needs are met and manufactured. They examine the dynamic interaction of products with everyday practices.

      The Design of Everyday Life presents a pathbreaking analysis of the sociology of objects, illuminating the connections between design and consumption.

      The Graphic Art of the Underground

      A Countercultural History

      Author(s):

      Ian Lowey and Suzy Prince

      The Graphic Art of the Underground: A Countercultural History takes the reader on a dazzling journey through the visual art and design of alternative and youth cultures from the 1950s to the present day.

      Ian Lowey and Suzy Prince’s compelling account draws upon the work of an array of artistic figures - many of whose lives have proved as colourful as their work- such as Ed ‘Big Daddy’ Roth, Kenny ‘Von Dutch’ Howard, Robert Williams, Robert Crumb, Martin Sharp, Jamie Reid, Linder Sterling, Gee Vaucher, Winston Smith, Barney Bubbles, Mark Ryden, Shag, Camille Rose Garcia, Marion Peck and Pete Fowler among numerous others.

      The Handbook of Design for Sustainability

      Editor(s):

      Stuart Walker and Jacques Giard

      Sustainability has emerged as a central issue for contemporary societies and for the world community as a whole. Furthermore, many of the social and environmental concerns that are embodied in the term ‘sustainability’ are directly or indirectly related to design. Designers help to define our human made environment - how it is produced, how it is used, and how long it endures. Despite some forty years of development and increased awareness of the critical relationships that exist between design decisions and modes of production, energy use, environmental impacts, the nature of work and human exploitation, design for sustainability is still not widely understood or followed. The Handbook of Design for Sustainability presents a comprehensive, state-of-the-art overview of this crucial subject - its development, its methods, its practices and its potential futures.

      Bringing together leading international scholars and new researchers to provide a substantive insight into the latest thinking and research within the field, The Handbook covers a breadth of historical and theoretical understandings and includes a series of original essays that explore methods and approaches for designers and design educators.

      The Handbook presents the first systematic overview of the subject that, in addition to methods and examples, includes historical perspectives, philosophical approaches, business analyses, educational insights and emerging thinking. It is an invaluable resource for design researchers and students as well as design practitioners and private and public sector organizations wishing to develop more sustainable directions.

      The Handbook of Design Management

      Author(s):

      Richard Buchanan, Richard Boland and Kyung-won Chung

      Editor(s):

      Rachel Cooper, Sabine Junginger and Thomas Lockwood

      The management of design has emerged as central to the operational and strategic options of any successful organization. The Handbook of Design Management presents a state-of-the-art overview of the subject - its methodologies, current debates, history and future.

      The Handbook covers the breadth of principles, methods and practices that shape design management across the different design disciplines. These theories and practices extend from the operational to the strategic, from the product to the organization.

      Bringing together leading international scholars, the Handbook provides a guide to the latest research in the field. It also documents the shifts that have been taking place both in management and in design which have highlighted the value of design thinking and design education to organizations.

      Presenting the first systematic overview of the subject - and offering a wide range of examples, insights and analysis - the Handbook is an invaluable resource for researchers and students in design and management, as well as for design practitioners and professional managers.

      The Handbook of Interior Architecture and Design

      Editor(s):

      Graeme Brooker and Lois Weinthal

      The Handbook of Interior Architecture and Design offers a compelling collection of original essays that seek to examine the shifting role of interior architecture and interior design, and their importance and meaning within the contemporary world.

      Interior architecture and interior design are disciplines that span a complexity of ideas, ranging from human behaviour and anthropology to history and the technology of the future. Approaches to designing the interior are in a constant state of flux, reflecting and adapting to the changing systems of history, culture and politics. It is this process that allows interior design to be used as evidence for identifying patterns of consumption, gender, identity and social issues.

      The Handbook of Interior Architecture and Design provides a pioneering overview of the ideas and arrangements within the two disciplines that make them such important platforms from which to study the way humans interact with the space around them.

      Covering a wide range of thought and research, the book enables the reader to investigate fully the changing face of interior architecture and interior design, while offering questions about their future trajectory.

      The Handbook of Visual Culture

      Author(s):

      Michael Gardiner, Gunalan Nadarajan and Catherine Soussloff

      Editor(s):

      Ian Heywood and Barry Sandywell

      Visual culture has become one of the most dynamic fields of scholarship, a reflection of how the study of human culture increasingly requires distinctively visual ways of thinking and methods of analysis. Bringing together leading international scholars to assess all aspects of visual culture, the Handbook aims to provide a comprehensive and authoritative overview of the subject.

      The Handbook embraces the extraordinary range of disciplines which now engage in the study of the visual - film and photography, television, fashion, visual arts, digital media, geography, philosophy, architecture, material culture, sociology, cultural studies and art history. Throughout, the Handbook is responsive to the cross-disciplinary nature of many of the key questions raised in visual culture around digitization, globalization, cyberculture, surveillance, spectacle, and the role of art.

      The Handbook guides readers new to the area, as well as experienced researchers, into the topics, issues and questions that have emerged in the study of visual culture since the start of the new millennium, conveying the boldness, excitement and vitality of the subject.

      The Invention of Craft

      Author(s):

      Glenn Adamson

      Glenn Adamson’s last book, Thinking Through Craft, offered an influential account of craft’s position within modern and contemporary art. Now, in his engaging sequel, The Invention of Craft, his theoretical discussion of skilled work is extended back in time and across numerous disciplines.

      Adamson searches out the origins of modern craft, locating its emergence in the period of the industrial revolution. He demonstrates how craft was invented as industry’s “other”, a necessary counterpart to ideas of progress and upheaval. In the process, the magical and secretive culture of artisans was gradually dominated through division and explication. This left craft with an oppositional stance, a traditional or anti-modern position.

      The Invention of Craft ranges widely across media, from lock-making, wood-carving and iron-casting to fashion, architecture and design. It also moves back and forth between periods, from the 18th century to the present day, demonstrating how contemporary practice can be informed through the study of modern craft in its moment of invention.

      The Visual Dictionary of Graphic Design

      Author(s):

      Gavin Ambrose and Paul Harris

      The Visual Dictionary of Graphic Design is a comprehensive guide to the numerous terms used within graphic design and associated disciplines.

      Over 250 terms are explained and contextualized, with concise definitions accompanied by illustrations and examples taken from historical and contemporary graphic design.

      The dictionary covers traditional practice and process terms as well as modern terminology. It also defines a wide variety of practical terms, such as Perfect binding, Deboss and Strikethrough, as well as movements and styles including Surrealism, Psychadelia and Postmodernism.

      The Visual Dictionary of Illustration is a comprehensive guide to the numerous terms associated with, and used within, the field of illustration.

      Over 250 terms are explained and contextualised, with concise definitions accompanied by examples taken from traditional and contemporary illustration.

      The dictionary covers traditional terms still in current usage as well as modern terminology such as Raster and Punk . It also includes a wide variety of practical terms, such as Collage, Woodcut and Storyboard , as well as movements and styles including Dada, Surrealism, and Romanticism .

      The Visual Dictionary of Pre-Press & Production

      Author(s):

      Gavin Ambrose and Paul Harris

      The Visual Dictionary of Pre-press & Production is a concise and comprehensive introduction to the world of print and production. Containing textual and visual defintitions for over 250 pre-press and production terms, this book is an invaluable reference tool for all students and practitioners of graphic design, typography, illustration and visual communication subjects. From practical terms such as Accents, Bitmap and Color calibration, to styles and finishes such as Canadian and half-Canadian, Perfect Bound and TCF (Totally Chlorine Free), this book contains both modern terminology and the traditional terms still in current usage.

      The Visual Dictionary of Typography

      Author(s):

      Gavin Ambrose and Paul Harris

      The Visual Dictionary of Typography is a guide to the many and varied terms used within typography. Arranged alphabetically from abstraction to x-height and blackletter to widow, each term is explained and contextualized with illustrations. More than 250 typographical terms are included. From practical terms such as accents, bitmap and classification to movements and styles such as constructivism, De Stijl, modernism and Swiss typography, this book contains both modern terminology and traditional terms still in current usage. The Visual Dictionary of Typography is an easy-to-use reference that will prove invaluable to anyone interested in typography and graphic design.

      Thinking Through Craft

      Author(s):

      Glenn Adamson

      Co-published in Association with the Victoria and Albert Museum, London

      This book is a timely and engaging introduction to the way that artists working in all media think about craft. Workmanship is key to today’s visual arts, when high ‘production values’ are becoming increasingly commonplace. Yet craft’s centrality to contemporary art has received little serious attention from critics and historians.

      Dispensing with clichéd arguments that craft is art, Adamson persuasively makes a case for defining craft in a more nuanced fashion. The interesting thing about craft, he argues, is that it is perceived to be ‘inferior’ to art. The book consists of an overview of various aspects of this second-class identity - supplementarity, sensuality, skill, the pastoral, and the amateur. It also provides historical case studies analysing craft’s role in a variety of disciplines, including architecture, design, contemporary art, and the crafts themselves. Thinking Through Craft will be essential reading for anyone interested in craft or the broader visual arts.

      Transforming Type examines kinetic or moving type in a range of fields including film credits, television idents, interactive poetry and motion graphics. As the screen increasingly imitates the properties of real-life environments, typographic sequences are able to present letters that are active and reactive. These environments invite new discussions about the difference between motion and change, global and local transformation, and the relationship between word and image.

      In this illuminating study, Barbara Brownie explores the ways in which letterforms transform on screen, and the consequences of such transformations. Drawing on examples including Kyle Cooper’s title sequence design, kinetic poetry and MPC's idents for the UK’s Channel 4, she differentiates motion from other kinds of kineticism, with particular emphasis on the transformation of letterforms into other forms and objects, through construction, parallax and metamorphosis. She proposes that each of these kinetic behaviours requires us to revisit existing assumptions about the nature of alphabetic forms and the spaces in which they are found.

      Verbalising the Visual: Translating Art and Design into Words by Michael Clarke introduces readers to a broad range of language and terminology: formal and informal, academic and colloquial, global and local, all of which can be found in current art and design discourse.

      Exploring the complex relationship between language, objects and meaning, Verbalising the Visual shows students how to select and effectively employ language to present oral and written critical assessments of visual culture.

      It includes a variety of examples and case studies that explore the many ways in which language is used to discuss, describe, analyze and critically evaluate art and design.

      Shortlisted for the Design History Society Scholarship Prize 2001-2002 What do things mean? What does the life of everyday objects after the check-out reveal about people and their material worlds? Has the quest for the real thing become so important because the high tech world of total virtuality threatens to engulf us? This pioneering book bridges design theory and anthropology to offer a new and challenging way of understanding the changing meanings of contemporary human-object relations. The act of consumption is only the starting point in objects lives. Thereafter they are transformed and invested with new meanings that reflect and assert who we are. Defining design as things with attitude differentiates the highly visible fashionable object from ordinary artefacts that are taken for granted. Through case studies ranging from reproduction furniture to fashion and textiles to clutter, the author traces the connection between objects and authenticity, ephemerality and self-identity. But beyond this, she shows the materiality of the everyday in terms of space, time and the body and suggests a transition with the passing of time from embodiment to disembodiment.

      Writing Design

      Words and Objects

      Editor(s):

      Grace Lees-Maffei

      How do we learn about the objects that surround us? As well as gathering sensory information by viewing and using objects, we also learn about objects through the written and spoken word - from shop labels to friends' recommendations and from magazines to patents. But, even as design commentators have become increasingly preoccupied with issues of mediation, the intersection of design and language remains under-explored. Writing Design provides a unique examination of what is at stake when we convert the material properties of designed goods into verbal or textual description. Issues discussed include the role of text in informing design consumption, designing with and through language, and the challenges and opportunities raised by design without language. Bringing together a wide range of scholars and practitioners, Writing Design reveals the difficulties, ethics and politics of writing about design.